How it Works: Recycled Polyester

Usually garments labelled as ‘Recycled Polyester’ are made from PET bottles; the bottles are collected, compressed and shipped to processing facilities where they are chopped into flakes and melted into small white pellets. The pellets are then spun into a yarn like fibre where it can be made into fabrics.

Recycled polyester uses approx 30% less energy to make garments than virgin polyesters, the processes save natural resources and lower greenhouse gas emissions in the use of chemicals.

 

Synthetic fibres far surpass natural fibres in environmental resistance so are often used for garments intended to protect the body from the elements or if a garment has specific requirements that natural garments just couldn’t meet. Recycled polyester acts in exactly the same way as a virgin fibre, anything you can expect or manipulate polyesters to do can also be done with recycled polyester.

 

The water used in virgin polyester production is a fraction of that used in cotton growing, and recycled polyester actually requires no water at all. The water used to grow India’s 2013 cotton exportation would have given 85% of the country 100 litres of water every day for a year and at current over 100million people in India still don’t have daily access to water.

At 7Active we are making real advances in the use of recycled polyester during production, we have daily enquiries regarding the use of responsibly processed fibres so we know it’s something clients are actively seeking. The accredited mills we work for can produce recycled polyester that will act in exactly the same way as a virgin fibre and the independent testing bodies we use for all orders can provide background information on the origins of the fibres should you require this.

If you’re looking to move over to recycled polyester or would like to start your business on an ethical footing then please leave your details on our ‘Enquiry Form’ and we can provide you with further details.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *